My not so secret confession?

I love reading.

I take a book wherever I go and love to curl up and read on the couch, in bed, on my white “reading” chair, at the beach – any time, anywhere!  I can’t even begin to imagine how many books I’ve read over my lifetime. I read so often, that I often forget the actual books! So I decided to start a review section on here (Book Worm) so I can share – and remember – all my reads!

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I like Nick Hornby. I think he is a good writer, not too cheesy. I think his books are fairly introspective and true to human nature.  Overall, I liked Juliet Naked, although it was no About A Boy (is it weird that I liked this one even better than Fever Pitch or High Fidelity?). This book tells the story of a woman (Annie) whose partner of 15+ years (Duncan) is obsessed with a once famous, now obscure musician – Tucker Crowe. A long-lost studio recording of Tucker’s draws different reactions from Annie and Duncan (she hates it, he loves it), and their relationship embarrassingly crumbles immediately. In an interesting turn of events, Annie’s critical review draws Tucker from his now normal life, and the two start up a friendship via email. Unique premise, right? That’s what I like most about Hornby’s writing. Reading about Annie pursuing this friendship, partly motivated because she knows how tortured Duncan would be knowing his idol was pen pals with his ex, is just so true to human nature.

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Overall I liked this book. It wasn’t what I was expecting (my friend Becky handed it over as a “light” read), but I did think the story was interesting. This book is set during the Civil Rights movement in Jackson, Mississippi, and tells the story of a young white female activist who convinces the black female maids and nannies in Jackson to share their stories with her, so she can publish a book and show the world the mistreatment and injustices that “The Help” face.  This storyline served as a prop for many smaller storylines, which was a nice setup, and you get to read the book from several different viewpoints, which worked really well. My one complaint is that the book is pretty long, and some parts really felt long. I think that anyone interested in American History during this time period would especially like this book. It shares stories that many of us might know to be true in the back of our heads, but that make you re-contemplate once you have the reminder.

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Eh. I really wanted to like this book. I like James Patterson. Come on, who doesn’t like Kiss the Girls?  This book tells the story of racism and lynching in the early 20th century, and really has nothing to do with Alex Cross aside from the fact that he introduces the story in the first two pages as a tale of family history. Which would have been fine, except the actual “Trial” is pretty predictable, as in a contrived KKK/white mob-style story. Not Patterson’s best!

I have a few girly ones in the pipeline! Coming up…

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What’s your favorite book? I love suggestions!

This question is literally impossible for me to answer. Some that stick out in my head are Homecoming, My Sister’s Keeper, The Giver, Jemima J, The Perks of Being a Wallflower, and Sentimental Education.

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